\ 2018 January | SEIU Local 205

January 2018

Crisis Averted (For Now) at Nashville General Hospital Thanks to Activism & Solidarity!

Union leaders confront Mayor Megan Barry after the surprise announcement from Meharry & HCA that could lead to cuts in jobs and patient services at General Hospital.

Union leaders confront Mayor Megan Barry after the surprise announcement from Meharry & HCA that could lead to cuts in jobs and patient services at General Hospital.

After SEIU members and community allies waged a grassroots campaign, Mayor Megan Barry finally agreed to a “reset” on her original plan to end inpatient services at Nashville General Hospital.

Barry’s pivot came after a surprise announcement on November 9 to restructure the hospital was revealed to the public during a press conference announcing a new partnership between Meharry and HCA. The Mayor’s proposal was short on specifics and contained inaccurate statistics about hospital beds, usage, and other metrics which caused a panic among hospital staff, patients, clergy and vendors.

Elected officials, hospital administrators, and healthcare advocates were completely caught off-guard by Barry’s announcement and had many of the mayor’s own supporters scratching their heads in confusion. In a discussion held at the Metro Council, the mayor’s chief financial officer and legal counsel both admitted they knew nothing about the proposal until shortly before it was made public.

SEIU members didn’t take the news lying down. Almost immediately, the union sprung into action as members spoke up at the Hospital Authority board meeting, turned out in droves to an emergency Metro Council meeting, wrote letters, called their council members, and engaged their churches, neighbors, and patients.

“If we as a union hadn’t pulled together and if we hadn’t worked together with our partners in the community, I honestly think that most of us would be out of jobs,” said Michael Foster, a service tech at General and SEIU member.

The union’s action, with help from our allies across the community, helped get the word out that the mayor’s proposal could threaten tens of millions in funding to the state’s safety net hospitals. It was also revealed that the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office would have to add another $3 million in its budget to pay for the changes the mayor was seeking since DCSO provides transportation and security for inmates who are served at General.

“We couldn’t have stopped this train as individuals. We needed to lock arms, stand together, work with our partners, and fight back,” said Myra Franklin, a registered nurse in General’s NICU.

The overall plan to create some kind of change at General Hospital is still in effect, though the mayor has conceded that it is ultimately the role of the Metro Council to implement any major changes at General after two councilmembers from opposite sides of the political spectrum announced a new ordinance that would prevent the mayor from acting unilaterally.

A proposed timeline by the mayor would now give her until December, 2018 to hear recommendations on “how we can come together as a community around a working model for the future”. The legislation in front of the Metro Council would extend the deadline to June, 2019 before any major decisions are made. There will be a new format in place engaging stakeholders to determine the future recommendations for General Hospital.

“This fight isn’t over yet and we’re going to need to keep doing this until the city gets the message once and for all: General Hospital needs to stay a safety net hospital and we’re going to do whatever it takes to keep it that way,” said Osa Richards, a registered nurse.

For all the latest news and updates on the struggle at Nashville General Hospital, join the “Save NGH” Facebook group or bookmark the “Save Nashville General” campaign website and sign their petition.

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Local 205 Endorses Daron Hall for Davidson County Sheriff

DCSO_SheriffHall-MembersService Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 205, the labor organization representing employees of the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office (DCSO), announced its endorsement of Daron Hall in his bid for re-election as county sheriff.

Hall has served four consecutive terms and three different mayoral administrations since he was first elected in 2002. During that time, corrections officers and other DCSO employees have seen steady increases in pay, better training, and improvements in their retirement benefits thanks in large part to the collaborative relationship SEIU has had with Sheriff Hall.

“We were glad to work with Daron on getting compression pay and salary increases for corrections officers over the last couple of years,” said Brad Rayson, president of SEIU Local 205. “Corrections work is hard and it is always changing – we need someone in that office who will listen to the employees when they see that there are problems and work tirelessly to try and fix them,” Rayson said. “We applaud Sheriff Hall’s effort to decriminalize those with mental or substance issues who enter our jails and his efforts to provide treatment to this population.”

“Sheriff Hall has demonstrated a commitment to helping improve pay and benefits for his staff and a proven track record of being an effective administrator,” said Linda Knox, an SEIU member who served on the union’s political committee. “Nashville is growing by leaps and bounds and our city needs someone who is a proven leader who can deal with the challenges that are set in front of them.”

Election Day is on May 1, 2018 and early voting begins on April. Complete information on early voting dates and voting locations is available from the Davidson County Election Commission at 615-862-8800.

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SEIU Local 205 represents thousands of public sector employees across the state of Tennessee, including employees of the Davidson County Sheriff’s Office.

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Vanderbilt: The Story So Far

FF-logo-orangeAt the end of 2016, non-tenure-track (“NTT”) faculty at Vanderbilt University began in earnest to find out how they could form a union. Their search led them to SEIU, which has been organizing college campuses across the U.S. for years with great success.

Take a look at this timeline (prepared by the faculty’s organizing committee) which chronicles their challenging (and still ongoing) journey to form a union.

 

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